Protecting against CSRF attacks in ASP.Net MVC

CSRF attacks are one of the many security issues that web developers must defend against.  Fortunately, ASP.Net MVC makes it easy to defend against CSRF attacks.  Simply slap on [ValidateAntiForgeryToken] to every POST action and include @Html.AntiForgeryToken() in every form, and your forms will be secure against CSRF.

However, it is easy to forget to apply [ValidateAntiForgeryToken] to every action.  To prevent such mistakes, you can create a unit test that loops through all of your controller actions and makes sure that every [HttpPost] action also has [ValidateAntiForgeryToken]. 

Since there may be some POST actions that should not be protected against CSRF, you’ll probably also want a marker attribute to tell the test to ignore some actions.

This can be implemented like this:

First, define the marker attribute in the MVC web project.  This attribute can be applied to a single action, or to a controller to allow every action in the controller.

///<summary>Indicates that an action or controller deliberately 
/// allows CSRF attacks.</summary>
///<remarks>All [HttpPost] actions must have 
/// [ValidateAntiForgeryToken]; any deliberately unprotected 
/// actions must be marked with this attribute.
/// This rule is enforced by a unit test.</remarks>
[AttributeUsage(AttributeTargets.Class | AttributeTargets.Method)]
public sealed class AllowCsrfAttacksAttribute : Attribute { }

Then, add the following unit test:

[TestMethod]
public void CheckForCsrfProtection() {
    var controllers = typeof(MvcApplication).Assembly.GetTypes().Where(typeof(IController).IsAssignableFrom);
    foreach (var type in controllers.Where(t => !t.IsDefined(typeof(AllowCsrfAttacksAttribute), true))) {
        var postActions = type.GetMethods()
                                .Where(m => !m.ContainsGenericParameters)
                                .Where(m => !m.IsDefined(typeof(ChildActionOnlyAttribute), true))
                                .Where(m => !m.IsDefined(typeof(NonActionAttribute), true))
                                .Where(m => !m.GetParameters().Any(p => p.IsOut || p.ParameterType.IsByRef))
                                .Where(m => m.IsDefined(typeof(HttpPostAttribute), true));

        foreach (var action in postActions) {
            //CSRF XOR AntiForgery
            Assert.IsTrue(action.IsDefined(typeof(AllowCsrfAttacksAttribute), true) != action.IsDefined(typeof(ValidateAntiForgeryTokenAttribute), true),
                            action.Name + " is [HttpPost] but not [ValidateAntiForgeryToken]");
        }
    }
}
typeof(MvcApplication) must be any type in the assembly that contains your controllers.  If your controllers are defined in multiple assemblies, you’ll need to include those assemblies too.

1 comments:

Post a Comment